Manslaughter Charges Filed in Death of Tito Traversa

Local prosecutors have filed manslaughter charges against five individuals as a result of the tragic climbing death of 12 year-old Italian climber Tito Traversa. A sixth individual is reportedly still under investigation.

By Brian Wright | August 26th, 2013

Young Italian climber Tito Traversa.

Local prosecutors have filed manslaughter charges against five individuals as a result of the tragic climbing death of 12-year-old Italian climber Tito Traversa. A sixth individual is reportedly still under investigation. In a translated version of a report on La Repubblica Torina, the prosecutor has accused the owner of the company that manufactured the draws, the owner of the retail store that sold them, the manager of the club that organized the trip Traversa was on, and the two instructors that were present during the accident of manslaughter. A relative of the girl to whom the draws belonged is also being “currently evaluated.”

The accident occurred on July 2, 2013 when Traversa weighted the rope so he could lower from the top of a warm-up climb only to fall 50 feet when eight of the ten draws he was using failed. An investigation determined that the draws had been incorrectly assembled, with the carabiner passing only through the plastic/rubber device used to keep the carabiner from slipping and not through the webbing itself.

News of the tragic accident shocked the climbing community, and blogs and climbing websites were soon buzzing with discussions about the rights and responsibilities of the growing group of very young and very talented climbers and the people in charge of their safety.

According to his 8a.nu page, Traversa had redpointed at least three routes rated 5.14, including one just a few days before his accident. He had also onsighted at least four routes rated 5.13a or harder.

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